Yūrei

According to traditional Japanese beliefs, when a person dies his soul lives on as a separate entity, passing on to a heavenly afterlife. This transition is accomplished through a number of funeral and post-funeral rites and prayers performed by their loved ones over many years. Through these rites, the soul is reunited with its ancestors and becomes a family guardian spirit. These ancestors are enshrined in the house and continue to be honored as members of the family, particularly during the summer holiday of Obon when they are said to return to the mortal world to be with their families.

 

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We have surpassed 300 likes on Facebook in just about a week or so. Thank you all for being here with us! Last night I was talking with my son and he was telling me some pretty interesting things regarding Japanese Mythology! He always amazes me with his knowledge. This photo here represents Yūrei. Yūrei is one of the Japanese words for ghost or spirit. Yūrei have been featured on Japanese mythological art work for thousands of years. According to traditional Japanese beliefs, when a person dies his soul lives on as a separate entity, passing on to a heavenly afterlife. This transition is accomplished through a number of funeral and post-funeral rites and prayers performed by their loved ones over many years. Through these rites, the soul is reunited with its ancestors and becomes a family guardian spirit. These ancestors are enshrined in the house and continue to be honored as members of the family, particularly during the summer holiday of Obon when they are said to return to the mortal world to be with their families.

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