Saule - Slavic/Baltic

Saule ~ The Sun Goddess

Saule was the beautiful and golden goddess of the sun. She was a very radiant and respected goddess to the people of the Baltic states. She had her own chariot pulled by twin horses, and she had long flowing golden hair and a crown to match. Saule is associated with fertility, warmth, health and life. Some associate her with being a mother goddess, specifically of orphan children. She rides through the skies on her chariot each day, providing warmth and sunlight to the world.

Saule was the mother of the planets, and the stars. It was her and Meness who wed and created the heavens. In the myths we learned that Saule had slashed the face of the moon god, Meness, for doing the unthinkable to her star daughter, Saules Meita. This is why the moon has craters and holes which can still be seen today, those are the scars from the sword wounds that Saule put on Meness. The moon would hide away forever in the darkness due to his shame and banishment by Saule, the glittering goddess.

Some of the symbols that Saule is associated with are, sun wheels, daisies, and rosettes. Saule is known to be a goddess of the summer solstice and she was celebrated specifically on June 23rd at Līgo feast. The sun goddess Saule and her daughter Saules Meita, are primary to the myths and lore of Lithuania and Latvia, east of Poland on the shores of the Baltic Sea. There are folk songs, also known as "dainas", which describe and prove the admiration the Baltic peoples had for their goddesses. Countless dainas have been recorded over time and can be found in the folkloric archives in Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. As Christianity began to take over Europe - the Baltic states held true to their traditions and worship of their goddess into the late middle ages. For the ancient Baltic people their lives were filled with rituals, even if it meant just greeting the sun each morning as she rose.

View this post on Instagram

Saule ~ The Sun Goddess Saule was the beautiful and golden goddess of the sun. She was a very radiant and respected goddess to the people of the Baltic states. She had her own chariot pulled by twin horses, and she had long flowing golden hair and a crown to match. Saule is associated with fertility, warmth, health and life. Some associate her with being a mother goddess, specifically of orphan children. She rides through the skies on her chariot each day, providing warmth and sunlight to the world. Saule was the mother of the planets, and the stars. It was her and Meness who wed and created the heavens. In the myths we learned that Saule had slashed the face of the moon god, Meness, for doing the unthinkable to her star daughter, Saules Meita. This is why the moon has craters and holes which can still be seen today, those are the scars from the sword wounds that Saule put on Meness. The moon would hide away forever in the darkness due to his shame and banishment by Saule, the glittering goddess. Some of the symbols that Saule is associated with are, sun wheels, daisies, and rosettes. Saule is known to be a goddess of the summer solstice and she was celebrated specifically on June 23rd at Līgo feast. The sun goddess Saule and her daughter Saules Meita, are primary to the myths and lore of Lithuania and Latvia, east of Poland on the shores of the Baltic Sea. There are folk songs, also known as "dainas", which describe and prove the admiration the Baltic peoples had for their goddesses. Countless dainas have been recorded over time and can be found in the folkloric archives in Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. As Christianity began to take over Europe - the Baltic states held true to their traditions and worship of their goddess into the late middle ages. For the ancient Baltic people their lives were filled with rituals, even if it meant just greeting the sun each morning as she rose. Art by: Lisa Hunt

A post shared by Myths and Beyond (@mythsandbeyond) on